Installations & NIMEs

Below is information on In Harmony and multiple NIMEs I've worked on.

Click to jump to a project: In Harmony  |  See.Move.Hear.  |  Wearable Electronic  |  Large Puzzle Pieces

 
8-Bit Gesture Maker

8-Bit Gesture Maker is a Pure Data patch authored by my colleague Gil Dori. It uses formulas Dr. Dori and I devised for auto-generating 8-bit era notification sound fx like a pause sound, a coin pick-up, and an echoing defeat. We presented our research findings at the 2020 GameSoundCon and demonstrated the 8-Bit Gesture Maker, which you can see in action at this link.

Koji Kondo Presentation (GSC 2019)
 

(some measures in the sheet music analysis are greyed-out to abide by copyright law)

Sound of the Wisps
 

8-Bit Gesture Maker is a Pure Data patch authored by my colleague Gil Dori. It uses formulas Dr. Dori and I devised for auto-generating 8-bit era notification sound fx like a pause sound, a coin pick-up, and an echoing defeat. We presented our research findings at the 2020 GameSoundCon and demonstrated the 8-Bit Gesture Maker, which you can see in action at this link.

 
See.Move.Hear.

Two paintings of subway maps were made with conductive ink for See.Move.Hear. The conductive ink was connected to an Arduino, making the paintings large capacitive sensors. I would classify these paintings more as interactive sound objects than NIMEs. My role for this project was sound designer via Max/MSP programming. I did not write the code for the Arduino, design the NIME, or work with the hardware.

These interactive paintings were shown at the Phoenix Art Museum in May 2017 as part of their Free Family Weekend event. Click here to see photos. Credits for this work can be seen at the end of the video above.

 
Wearable Electronic

Alongside Gino Ceresia, I designed a wearable electronic. The wearable is a black cardigan sweater that sends serial data over a private wireless network.

 

There are accelerometers built into the sleeves. The sweater also has conductive fabric sewn into the left wrist and right elbow. This makes it possible to trigger events by touching the wrist to the elbow.

Among other integrated hardware, the sweater used an XBee board,

Teensy microcontrollers, and LilyPad accelerometers. It was funded by a GPSA JumpStart Grant.

Large Puzzle Pieces

I collaborated with painter Amelia Boon to create large-sized puzzle pieces. I put accelerometers in them so that they'd create sound upon being moved. I also handled the Max programming.

When the boxes are stacked properly, they form the neurodiversity symbol on one side and Tetris-looking pieces on the other. This suggests looking at intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) as a form of diversity, rather than as a puzzle to be solved.