Below are multiple featured compositional works from my portfolio.

Choose to view by genre: Chamber Music  |  Laptop Ensemble  |  Fixed Media  |  Art Song

 

string quartet

Desert Ruminations is a two-movement work. The first movement, entitled Anthropogenic Effect, contrasts delicate sounds with overbearing rhythms. The second movement is called Drought Ritual and it is meant to be a call for rain from the same place that has suffered such devastating anthropogenic effects. 

The performers in this video are Emilio Vazquez, Clarice Collins, Daniel Lorenzo, and Alex Duke.

5 homemade clarinets and 2 found percussion set-ups

Funding Cut will be recorded during the summer of 2018. The piece is also going to be featured in the forthcoming 8th edition of America's Musical Landscape, which is a textbook commonly used for teaching music history.

 

laptop ensemble

There is an excerpt of Sinken on the home page of this website. Currently, there are 3 versions of Sinken: one for laptop trio, one for laptop quartet, and one for laptop trio with overtone singer. The version above is the quartet version. 

Sinken has been heard at the Spoleto Festival (Italy), Naru Arts Center (South Korea), Kulturhaus alte feuerwache Studiobühne (Berlin), and Monk Space (Los Angeles).

 

fixed media

This short fixed media piece was written in response the proposed American Healthcare Act. The text is a collage of quotes and paraphrases, complete with citations. The voice reading the text is Siri, and the droning sound in the piece is derived from the alert tone made by an iPhone. This was a direct response to House Representative Jason Chaffetz's comments, where he equated the cost of healthcare to the cost of an iPhone. As the piece progresses, the alert tone's bit rate is lowered and frequencies are removed from Siri's voice until there is nothing left.

 

art song for piano and bass

The text for this art song comes from Shakespeare's King Henry VI, part 3, act 5, scene 6. In this scene Richard has just stabbed an already dead King Henry. He then slips into a terrifying monologue.

The performance on this track is given by Neil Edwards (bass) and Eric Hiller (piano).